The spread of the new corona­virus

The numbers in this article only show the confirmed cases of infected, deceased and recovered people. Different countries have different routines for if and when they test people and are likely to have a large number of unreported cases not only for the number of infected people but also for the recovered ones.


Read the method section at the bottom of the article to understand all the numbers correctly.

Currently in Sweden


Here are the confirmed cases and deaths due to the coronavirus in Sweden that the Public Health Authority reports - the figures are updated once a day, tuesday-friday after 14:00.

The following figures are an underreporting of the actual number of cases as they only show those who have been tested positive, not all those who have been infected with the coronavirus.

Below are a number of different diagrams and graphs that in various ways show the current situation in Sweden as a whole and in the country's regions. Read the texts around the diagrams carefully and see the method section at the bottom of the article to understand everything correctly. We show both the number of reported deaths per day in one chart and the dates on which the deaths actually occurred in another.



The development of deaths

The development of deaths, calculated from at least ten reported deaths in each country, quantity and with proportion. Figures are updated once a day when Johns Hopkins University releases its daily report.

Press in the timeline below to jump in time

Click to select which countries you want to see in the chart. The bars of the respective countries show new deaths from day to day. The scales are individual and cannot be compared.


The state of the world

The following figures are updated once a day, when Johns Hopkins University releases its daily report.

Updated  

confirmed cases


deaths


recovered




Source and method

The numbers in this article only show the confirmed cases of infected, deceased and recovered people. Different countries have different routines for if and when they test people and are likely to have a large number of unreported cases not only for the number of infected people but also for the recovered ones and in some cases deaths.

Currently in Sweden

The figures in this section that focus on Sweden are updated once a day, tuesday-friday when the Public Health Authority releases its daily report - around 14:00.

The number of new deaths in the last 30 days in Sweden shows the number of people who have died day by day. 50 new reported cases at the Public Health Agency on a given day does not mean that 50 people have died since yesterday - but that 50 new deaths have been reported - which may have occurred several days back in time. These bars are updated historically, just as the Public Health Agency does - and the deaths end up on the days where they actually occurred.

Due to the delay in the reporting from the regions, we have chosen to mark the last 10 days as uncertain. However, in some cases, data corrections can be made even further back in time.

Development of deaths over time: Here we report deaths due to corona day by day for the entire period. These bars also show the day when the death occurred. The trend line is a rolling average of seven days. For each day in the series, an average value is calculated of the deceased of the current day and the death of the next six days.

Development of reported deaths: This diagram shows the figure that the Swedish Public Health Agency reports every day and that most media report daily - how many new deaths have been reported to them in the last 24 hours. It does not place the deaths on the correct date, but thus shows how many new deaths have been reported on a given day (but most of them have occurred in previous days). There is a lag in reporting, especially during weekends - which means that the bars go up and down a lot.

Development of reported confirmed cases: The diagram shows the number of reported, confirmed cases of corona disease (covid-19). These numbers are mainly determined by how many people are tested for the virus. The more people that are tested - the more cases of disease can be detected and reported. At the Swedish Public Health Agency, you can read more about which and how many are tested.

The situation in the regions: There are two diagrams for each region. The top one shows the number of reported deaths per day in the region. The red line is a seven-day average. Above the chart you can see the total number of deaths in the region, the latest reported number and how many deaths have been reported in the last fourteen days.

The second graph on the regions shows the number of reported, confirmed cases of disease per day in the region. The red line is a seven-day average. Above the chart you can see the total number of reported, confirmed, disease cases in the region, the latest reported number and how many covid-19 cases have been reported in the last fourteen days.

We have chosen to use the Public Health Authority as a source for the Swedish part - because they report cases by region. But: The fact that we use two different sources in the article as a whole means that the figures in the Sweden part and the World part do not always match.

Development of deaths

The diagram showing the development of deaths has a y-axis showing the number and an x-axis over the number of days from the day of the tenth death. The Y scale is logarithmic. This means that the steps in the scale increase by a multiplication, 1, 10, 100, 1000 instead of, as on a linear scale, increasing at fixed intervals such as 1,2,3,4. We have chosen to show both a logarithmic scale on the number of dead and a linear on the proportion of dead, in order to give as much information as possible. If you look at the linear scale over the proportion of dead per country, for example, Italy's line at first continues almost straight up and it is difficult to read whether the rate at which people die has decreased or not. A logarithmic scale can highlight a change more clearly than a linear scale can. For example, by means of our logarithmic scale, we can see that Italy no longer has an exponential development (that deaths are doubled at a steady rate) but that their actions have had an effect. We therefore show a logarithmic scale so that we can more clearly detect changes in the rate of development and be able to compare them between the countries.

Source: Johns Hopkins CSSE


The state of the world

Figures for the worlds countries are updated once a day - when Johns Hopkins CSSE releases its daily file of data. That usually happens during the night Swedish time.

Different countries have different routines regarding both corona testing and how they report deceased due to the virus. It is important to keep that in mind before comparing the countries with each other.

Japan's figures are a compilation of reported cases from Japan and the cases of passengers on the Diamond Princess ship outside Japan.

We include the islands of Saint Barthélemy and Saint Martin in France's results.

Population data from World bank and The World Factbook.


Log of changes and updates

Here we will post any significant changes or updates made to this article as of 2020-04-02.

2020-08-04: Information on the most recently reported number of deaths and confirmed cases has been added in each region.

2020-07-30: The chart for the number of new deaths in the last fourteen days is expanded to the last 30 days.

2020-07-30: A new chart is added that shows the development of reported deaths per day.

2020-07-30: A new chart is added showing the development of reported, confirmed cases per day.

2020-07-30: New charts for all the regions in Sweden are added, showing the number of reported cases reported over time.

2020-06-23: The Sweden section again shows the number of reported cases in each region, as requested by several readers.

2020-06-17: The Sweden part has got a more participatory view of developments in the different regions. Focus on deaths as the number of infected people is more difficult to use as it is directly related to how many people are being tested.

2020-06-17: Updated the default countries for "The evolution of deaths" so that more of the countries with increased cases are defaulted.

2020-05-20: We have changed the data source for the visualizations using Johns Hopkins. Instead of creating our own time series based on daily reports, we now use Johns Hopkins time series.

2020-04-29: We add a view in the Sweden section that shows the development of deaths throughout the period. The last ten days figures are marked as uncertain due to the backlog in reporting.

2020-04-20: The countries' cards now show 14 days of development instead of seven.

2020-04-16: We set a minimum limit of 100 cases identified for a country to receive its own card. We do it to get better performance on the site which now has a lot of sections.

2020-04-15: The situation in the world - the part is being expanded so that one can choose whether to see the number of deceased or the number of cases found in the countries' cards.

2020-04-15: We change the starting point in the line diagram of the number of deaths per one million inhabitants per country from the day of the tenth death to the day with one death per one million inhabitants.

2020-04-08: The "The situation in the world" section now focuses more on the number of deceased than the number of cases found. The number of cases found is difficult to compare between countries as there is a lot of difference in how the countries choose to test, which is why we have now switched to highlighting the number of deceased more.

2020-04-06: The figure of deaths in each country is expanded with the opportunity to compare more countries.

2020-04-04: We change the bar chart for the number of new deceased in Sweden to be able to correct the figures afterwards - since the reporting can be delayed. The new figure "Died on an uncertain date" is therefore added.

2020-04-03: We are adding a new bar chart showing the number of deaths per day and total for Sweden over the last ten days.

2020-04-03: We add a view into the evolution of deaths so that one can look at the proportion of deaths per one million inhabitants for each country. We also add South Korea to the graph. We change the graph to start the day of the countries' tenth deaths on the logarithmic scale instead of the day of the first death.

2020-04-02: We add a line diagram of the development of deaths per country on a logarithmic scale.

2020-04-03: The "Current situation in Sweden" section is expanded with a bar graph of the number of new deceased in the last ten days.


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Published: 28 januari 2020